Stay safe

Moscow historically enjoyed a low crime rate

Girl pickpocking
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However, Moscow is a booming metropolis, so common sense should be used. Avoid dark alleys — like you would anywhere else. Check the advice from your Foreign Office for entry requirements, health, safety, local laws and customs.

Do keep in mind, that while traveling in Moscow, as in the rest of Russia, you must always have your passport with you. If you look non-white, your papers may get checked more often than usual.

Usually, the police will demand to see your papers to check if you have been registered within seven business days (used to be three business days up to March 25th, 2011) of your arrival into Moscow. Always remember that if you stay in a hotel then you are automatically registered and will be handed a confirmation paper at a time of check-in, so no worry in this case.

Most policemen do not speak a word of English, but they will let you know if your papers are not in order and you must go with them to the police precinct. In any case, if you are a decent looking person (regardless of race and nationality) odds to be asked to show documents are minuscule, and the police are usually looking for migrants from Central Asia.

Also note that in winter months, streets in Moscow can get very slippery. Take a pair of grippy shoes or, even better, boots (to prevent twisted ankles) and a waterproof raincoat. Take care as ice patches are often hard to spot, even when they appear to have been cleared or melted. Wearing non-grippy shoes could result in injury.

Downtown Moscow is very brightly lit, and a lot of the wide roads have underground pedestrian walkways. Those are well lit too — so you shouldn't worry about going down inside them. But of course, like anywhere else, do use common sense, and keep an eye out for pickpockets.

Use the pedestrian crossings to cross the street, as traffic can get pretty crazy sometimes.